Thursday, November 01, 2007

I Love Grand Forks #2

"I Love Grand Forks" is going to become a monthly tradition on GFL. There's lots to love in this city and I love reading through everyone's reasons. Name a few of the reasons why you love Grand Forks.

53 comments:

Anonymous said...

I Heart the Dog Park. Very cool.

Anonymous said...

Old, tall elm trees lining the streets as their leaves turn gold & drift to the ground...

Anonymous said...

Farmers' Market has gone from cheesy to a real draw- bringing people of all ages back downtown for a reason other than to party. Not that I don't appreciate the nightllife, too ;)

Anonymous said...

I love GF because of the fighting sioux nicname debate. I love GF cuz u can get really drunk wihtout gettin kicked out of the bar. I lvoe grand forks becuz of cops that let so many things slide.

akm said...

Brother, this guy again?

Szymanski's Designated Driver said...

Sorry to rip on this... this is a good idea for a one-time deal, but every month? Are we really going to find that many more things we love about Grand Forks in a month's time?

That being said, I love the hockey games...and hopefully we can bring another championship home this year.

Elucidarian said...

"I love GF because of the fighting sioux nicname debate. I love GF cuz u can get really drunk wihtout gettin kicked out of the bar. I lvoe grand forks becuz of cops that let so many things slide."

Is this a real person's opinion or a just a little flamethrower? All those misspellings and bad grammar; it look constructed to me.

Anyway, call me crazy, but sometimes I really love the wind. Not the sub-zero, steal your breath away kind of wind, mind you. I like walking across the Sorlie in summer and feeling that river wind traffic funnel it's way Canadaward. I like being buffeted along as I walk down a sidewalk in the mild autumn air. I like standing against a stiff breeze, feeling like I'm going to accomplish something tremendous that day. The wind inspires me.

Charlie said...

"Forget not that the earth delights to feel your bare feet and the winds long to play with your hair." A memorable phrase, spoken by a much wiser man than myself: Kahlil Gibran.

Ah. I can identify with that, eclucidarian; something about the heritage, perhaps, too...strong Scandinavians, Germans, and the like. Yeah...I like that, too...

Definitely. And this fall has presented us with a most generous autumn to sample just that!

Anonymous said...

It's true about the wind, and it's easy to take it for granted. Go somewhere without wind and you'll immediately feel what's missing in the air. Stagnant air = the suck.

river man said...

I like Grand Forks because its a growing city. But I hope it doesn't grow too much where it becomes unaffordable like a big city.

"something about the heritage, perhaps, too...strong Scandinavians, Germans, and the like. Yeah...I like that, too..."

I love the heritage here too and the increasing diverstiy of people in this city. Somethings missing though, I'd like to see more Native culture influence in this area. Like Native business and Native architecture. Although I'm neutral on whether we keep the nickname and logo, it is a good logo designed by a Native and if it stays, its one peice of art Natives and whites can be be proud of.

Anonymous said...

Love the greenway and the bike paths!! I don't care what Terry Bjerke says...they are a wonderful addition to this city...

Anonymous said...

Enjoy Terry Bjerke, to hell with the greenway and bike path. Will Ralph Englestad build new and largest Indian Museum ?

Anonymous said...

Terry Bjerke might be the dumbest human in GF.....at least in the top ten.

Anonymous said...

Who's Terry Bjerke?

Anonymous said...

Terry Bjerke is a former GF Councilman who believed in bare bone budgets. I wondered if his family had cable television,flower beds and treats for the kids. He opposed many city projects-some aesthetic and some for general population use. The greenway would be one.

bethski said...

I love that greenway, its provided something us outdoor people can go to when we cant make it to the lake for fishing. If you ever go on a nice evening walk on the greenway right after 5pm you end up running into all sorts of people to talk to.
I heart the greenway.

Goon said...

I really love the smell of the beat plant :)

naturalplastics said...

I love it because people say hi to you, whether you know them or not. I love that you don't have to wait in line long for anything. I love that people are friendly and up-beat.

I really took those things for granted, but when I was living in Wyoming, it was a world of difference. It's so good to be back.

Goon said...

Your right natural plastic, I like the fact that there is little if no crime up here and if you leave your garage door open by accident you won't return to a half empty garage. It doesn't hurt that I live across the street from a state trooper either.

GrandForksGuy said...

Ok, a monthly version of this thread probably is pushing it....how about every other month? I like to have some regularity with when I put up different types of threads. For instance, each week's open thread now always comes first thing on Monday. I like regularity.

Goon said...

I look as the thread as a spoof, I mean GF isn't worst place to live but it is a bit backwards, you know the excessive taxes, the horrible smells and it lacks a view. If you like Hunting, golf and Fighting Sioux hockey it an ok place to live. The groud is literally froze 6 months out of the year.

GrandForksGuy said...

A spoof? I certainly wouldn't consider a thread entitled "I love Grand Forks" very "spoofy." As evidenced by the wide variety of reasons readers continue to post, there are many, many reasons to love Grand Forks.

I know I'm picky, but I also totally disagree with the "backwards" thing and the reasons you state.

Goon said...

I don't think Grand Forks offers a lot as far as a view goes.

In my HMO I think GND is pretty backwards.

Anonymous said...

backwards in what ways? I think you should be called on that one. In most places your tax burden is the same, as we pay very little in state tax compared to most. lacking a view is also quite subjective. I like the prairie view of a big sky, beautiful sunrises and sunsets and farmland. Here it is in November and the ground is far from frozen...six months from now will be May, and the ground won't be frozen then either. Lets at least keep it real here.

Goon said...

If I want to call the way the city government runs this town as backward that is my peragative (sp) the taxs in this town are way out of wack. Backwards is telling someone that they opinion is wrong on a blog post that my friends is backswards.

I ask you to go out side and smell the air in grand forks when they start processing the beats at the Crystal sugar plant. Pew...

Notice I said this town was backwards, I didn't say I hate it. I also believe it wasn't for hunting and golfing and watching Sioux hockey I would be compelled to move on. Now Bismarck has a view, check out hawktree golf course that is a view. Go south of Mandan that is a view.

The park in Medora is a view.

Charlie said...

"I don't think Grand Forks offers a lot as far as a view goes.

In my HMO I think GND is pretty backwards."

---HMO? Humble opinion, is that correct? We all know about opinions being like {fill in the blank}; everyone has one. And I respect one's right to an opinion. In support of mine, I gotta ask why we've gained so many great people who've decided to make ND their home---and GFKS, especially---upon completion of their service in the air force? Ditto, those folks who either teach or were students at UND... Or the occasional young couple that have relocated their family from California or some similar heavily populated area...ah, just a few that quickly come to mind.

I wish I had a gallon of gas for each person I've met that has commented on the endless sky and the beauty of the changing seasons. Seriously. Sometimes I, too, long for a lake greeting me in the morning, or a corridor of snow-covered pines alongside my pathway---but I also recall the time I drove hundreds of miles in Wisconsin, unable to see more than a mile in front of me, relying only on the mileposts to determine where I was at at any given moment; it was like coming out of a snowstorm when I hit the prairie and could see for miles!

Sorry to get carried away; I'll excuse myself on the lateness of the evening and get myself to bed. First, though, I think I'll check out the auroras in the northern sky. Along with the multitude of stars overhead, it's a helluva high!

If that's 'backward,' so be it. :o)

Charlie said...

Might I suggest a scenic golf course closer to home, that of the one just NE of Larimore, Goon?

Ever take a short drive up to the Walhalla area? Some good golf there, too, btw...and hunting and fishing, without crowds, besides.

Just tapping a few resources, off the cuff, long as you brought up the point. *s*

We got just about everything there is, if we take a moment to think about it.

Goon said...

Charlie,
I said Grand Forks, ND doesn't have a view, the Pembina Gorge has a great view. I have seen the Walhalla it also has a nice area.

If you come from say El Paso Texas Grand Forks, probably has a nice view.

river man said...

For everyone trying to change your opinion, Goon, I respect your opinion as I respect people and the freedom of expression. I come from the mountains of Montana, and I can recall hundreds of times being way up in the mountains and looking down on the lakes, rivers, towns, and farms. Wow what a view. I also love the view here, too, especially in the greenway and and out of town. I also enjoy blue or fair skies and occasionally threatening weather is fun to watch, especially lightning shows and developing cloud patterns. Now I wish Canad Inn had built a sky deck or or observation deck on the top floor. One of Montana's highest buildings, an 18 story hotel, has a restaurant and bar on their top floor, so why didn't Canad Inn put one up there.

naturalplastics said...

Oh man... I moved here from Gillette - if grand forks is backwards, Gillette is upsidedown.

Just the fact that someone has built houses, businesses, or restaurants here attests to that. I can write a novel on how backwards THAT place is.

That being said, Grand Forks is no twin cities, or even fargo for that matter, but I wouldn't have it any other way.

Anonymous said...

"so why didn't Canad Inn put one up there."

Excellent question.

I'm not so concerned about living at a location with a view. I'd rather make sure the location is within distance of such places. We have both forests and badlands within a half-day's drive which is reasonable.

Anonymous said...

The Plain Brown Wrapper. Mmm. Good for the wife.

Anonymous said...

And my wife too. It's like almost as good as PB&J.

Anonymous said...

Grand Forks is growing from a backwards small town (dining, Marilyn Haggerty, entertainment options) to an up-and-coming small city (UND, Greenway, Arts) so naturally exhibits traits of both

Anonymous said...

Sorry, I didn't mean "backwards". That implies something different altogether. I meant to say, "unsophisticated."

Anonymous said...

I love the accoustics at the Chester Fritz. And check out their jazzy new web site:

I don't know how long it's been up, but check out the Chester Fritz Auditorium's new web site. VERY NICE!

http://www.cfa.und.edu/

Anonymous said...

I love GF because all my relatives live elsewhere.......

Anonymous said...

sometimes, that is a plus, isn't it!
I love GF because people are still appalled about the violent crime that happens here - meaning that it isn't something that happens all the time, and that people still stand up for their community.

Anonymous said...

i luv of undiverse we are with ethnic groups

river man said...

"i luv of undiverse we are with ethnic groups"

I love diversity. I'm guessing the Grand Cities is between 90% and 95% white. But not a day passes when I don't see a person from African, Asian, Arabic, Indian, Hispanic or Native background. I respect those from different cultures, and I encourage others to do the same. Befriend someone from a different culture, get to know them. And learn to respect all people and their inherent dignity. Personally, I have a few friends who are of a different ethnicty and I enjoy working with them and getting to know them.

Anonymous said...

http://www.cfa.und.edu/

Yes, it is nice. I wonder why they did not use some local talent to design the web page instead of a company in Denver though?

Anonymous said...

LOL, I just looked at their portfolio and all the web sites they have designed are in Grand Forks. It looks as if they are doing the UND web page as well. At least from what they show in the portfolio, they are doing the home page of UND and other sub pages. Interesting. I wonder if it is an alumni.

Anonymous said...

But if you check out their "Company" info, it says,

"Dynamic Graphx was created by Bo Frize in Grand Forks, North Dakota. Bo graduated with a Bachelor’s Degree from The University of North Dakota in May 2006."

Anonymous said...

Who cares if a city is 'diverse' or not? Does that really mean anything? Does it help? No, it's just what people want to see to make them feel comfortable because they can;t read people beyond skin color.

Grand Forks is one of the nicest cities I have been in, and I have lived in NYC PHILLY, Wilmington, DE, all of NJ, Los Angeles, and visited every state in the nation, and every major city.

Grand Forks has no view, but neither does NYC unless you take a trek up a giant building and spend cash.

Grand Forks is still 'nice ND' where Fargo has gotten crazed in the past few years. Fargo is sort of an EC-lite city now with all the anger, stress, wild eyed drivers, and grumpy retail people. Hope that doesn't jump up north anytime soon.

Anonymous said...

Grand Forks is not the best place I have lived, but it's not the worst. In fact, instead of the Grand Cities, our motto should be "It's not as bad as you think". I think it is funny that people in Bismarck and the western part of the state cringe when I travel there and say I live in Grand Forks. To most of the folks out there, GF is known for being a cold and very un-scenic place. It took me a long time to come to grips to living here. The flatness is difficult unless you grew up in the Red River Valley. My first impression of Grand Forks was driving down South Washington (and South Washington is a very ugly street)., a tough image to get rid of.

Anonymous said...

"It's not as bad as you think."

I've actually said this, lolz.

The thing I love most about Grand Forks is the trees lining the streets of all the neighborhoods that are more than 25 years old. It turns every street into a postcard scene. I've always sorta wondered what kind of trees they are. I'm sure someone here knows... ?

Anonymous said...

Even though I was born in the western part of the state, I cringe when I think about living there now...big bore if you don't hunt. Scenery isn't everything, but if it is to you, think of GF as the Gateway to Lake Country. You're not there, but you can see it from here.

Anonymous said...

The best thing about Grand Forks is the smell of agriculture and American Crystal, without American Crystal and agriculture Grand Forks would be nothing.

Anonymous said...

I love that it only takes me a few minutes to get from home to work (I was used to an hour commute each way)...I love that I have a beautiful, 119-year-old house that isn't falling down and live in a neighborhood surrounded by other similar houses...I love that a "traffic jam" is the parking lot clearing out of the Alerus after a football game or concert...and most of all, I love that living in Grand Forks has given me lots of opportunities I would not have had elsewhere (both career- and hobby-wise).

Lynsey said...

I love the snow. Seriously! With the prospects of moving to the South looming in my future, the winter weather is something I'm excited to have this winter. I'm excited for both the pretty, light powder that first makes it look like winter and makes me wonder if any other season can compete with winter, and the massive windy blizzards that will make me think "Oh, at least I'll be in the South NEXT winter."

I'll miss the snow, I know I will.

Elucidarian said...

The thing I love most about Grand Forks is the trees lining the streets of all the neighborhoods that are more than 25 years old. It turns every street into a postcard scene. I've always sorta wondered what kind of trees they are. I'm sure someone here knows... ?

I tend to overlook the ugliness of spaces like S. Washington because I grew up seeing it. However, when I imagine the same stretch of road buffeted by lines of trees, it would make a huge difference. They're trying to do that on the south half where they planned space for greenery, but from around 17th to Demers they would have to restructure the lots quite a bit.

Anonymous said...

I love UND, Sioux Hockey, how safe the town is, the open hockey rinks in all the parks around town, once again how much UND contributes the the community and don't ask for much in return, downtown bars, how the chester fritz has gotten jerry seinfeld to come to town twice,

art_hanus said...

i have tried to love this place. i hate it. so sorry, in my HMO please get out and see the world. not just a few other states and Canada. really i could go on and on, but you will never truly see my point. this is your world, just know there so much more out there. its in your hands to open your eyes.